Guelo! FOKAI IRELAND!

February 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guelu putting the final touches (at Fokai Ireland’s Grasshopper Lounge), on his model Proa hours before Fokai Amphibious Division, TASA, and The Guam Waterman Club’s ‘ presentation of The Flying Proa to Ireland Seafarers this evening at The Oar in Crosshaven Ireland

FOKAI PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

February 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

FOKAI PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

Like many other clothing companies, we started out with just printing on wholesale blank items. Almost 20years later and now product starts from a roll of fabric, washed cut and shaped from in-house templates, printed, stitched, packaged, then sent to the shelves of our flagship stores.

Though this takes a lot more time and resource, your longtime support is more than worth the weight.

#itsafamilything

 

 

From POSTGUAM: Guamanians to compete in Spanish sling-stone competition

February 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

From POSTGUAM: Guamanians to compete in Spanish sling-stone competition

Article by Matt Weiss of The Post Guam

In March, a small three-man Guamanian contingent will be headed to Mallorca, Spain, to compete in an international sling-stone competition called the IV Encuentro Internacional Dia de les Illes Balears 2017. More than 20 nations from around the world will compete to see who has the most dead-on and distanced slingers. Guam’s slingers will consist of Roman Dela Cruz, Ben “Guelu” Rosario and Tony Piaulig.

While the original intention was to create a nationally recognized Guam team, Dela Cruz said, “A lack of time and busy schedules didn’t allow” it. While he admits there’s no way to know if they’re Guam’s best, they are, nonetheless, committed. “There’s no guarantee that we’re the best slingers on the island, but no doubt that we’re dedicated slingers and we’re putting in our practice time.”

Promoting culture through sport

Hoping to see a resurgence in Guamanians paying respect to the ancient Chamorros, Dela Cruz explained why he and the team decided to get involved in the Spanish sling-stone competition: “Our venture of jumping it into sport is actually a path to revive slinging among our people and to connect them not just with slinging, but primarily into the interest, preservation and rejuvenation of other traditional practices as well.”

Having received an invitation from two-time slinging champion Sam Christian Wirk of Austria, the trio will be representing more than just Guam. “The three of us … will be venturing to Spain to represent not just the Chamorro people, but also to represent Micronesia.”

Dela Cruz said he’s been slinging stones for nearly eight years, Rosario’s been at it for more than 20 years, and Piaulig has been slinging since he was a child on the island of Palowat. With over 60 years of slinging experience between them, and with a little luck, they will weave their way through the bracket and represent Guam with honor and respect.

Skill improves with perseverance

Dela Cruz, the team’s spokesman shared some of the competition’s rules: “The object for the competition we’re aiming for is, for the most part, based on accuracy from increasing distances as you advance through the brackets.” He shared that only locally gathered tournament stones must be used and slings must be made from organic material. “Only slings of natural fibers are allowed, and the stones will be natural river stones from the area of the competition.”

Dela Cruz, the least experienced of the group, never thought he would progress in the sport as far as he has. “I thought I would never get anywhere with it. For almost three years, I couldn’t get it straight; I was convinced it was beyond me.” He said that men like Pat Ayuyu and Rosario helped him improve tremendously. “I have a great respect for them and I am thankful for them every day for keeping me on this journey.“

He offered some advice in parting: “I would love to encourage everyone to try slinging. With the right mindset, it can be incredibly invigorating, even enchanting, like the sword to the samurai.”

Four men and three Guam Fire department personnel were recognized for their heroism during a ceremony at Adelup on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017.

January 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four men and three Guam Fire department personnel were recognized for their heroism during a ceremony at Adelup on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. 

Fokai Team Rider Ken Concepcion used what he learned from training with safety agencies in real life as he and others helped save paddlers whose outrigger canoe capsized on Jan. 17.

The governor’s office on Thursday gave Concepcion, Brandon Leon Guerrero,  Vincent Flores and Kawika Naholoowa certificates of recognition as heroes of Guam.

Guahan Napu President Willie Byerly, second from left, is photographed with local bodyboarders, from left, Ken Concepcion, Vincent Flores and Brandon Leon Guerrero, as they display “Hero of Guahan” certificates they were presented during a ceremony at Adelup on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. The bodyboarders, and three Guam Fire Department personnel, were recognized for their actions in rescuing six paddlers whose outrigger canoe was overturned by rough seas near the entrance of the Hagåtña boat basin on Jan. 17. Also recognized but not present for the ceremony was civilian, Kawika Naholoowa. Guahan Napu is a local non-profit association of surfers and body-boarders.

- Rick Cruz/PDN

#fokaiamphibiousdivision
#guamwatermansclub

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS

January 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing Americans to Serve in the Military, Special Ops, Police, & Fire Fighting

Stew Smith is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, a former Navy SEAL Lieutenant, and author of several fitness and self defense books such asThe Complete Guide to Navy SEAL Fitness, Maximum Fitness, The Special Ops Workouts, and SWAT Fitness.

Certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and as military fitness trainer, Stew has trained thousands of students for Navy SEAL, Special Forces, SWAT, FBI, ERT and many other law enforcement professions.

Stew has written more than 400 articles and 40 eBooks sold at both Military.com and StewSmith.com.  He is a consultant and presenter with the government in the area of troop physical development through his non-profit Heroes of Tomorrow. See www.heroesoftomorrow.org for more information.

He has appeared on many television shows such as:The National Geographic Channels Fight Science and in several newspaper and magazine features to include Washington Post, Mens Fitness, Mens Health, and Sports Illustrated.

Stew Smith has worked professionally in the military fitness arena for over 15 years focusing on a specialty of helping people become Navy SEALs or any other member of a unit that requires a physical fitness test (PFT). Of course many of Stew’s readers just want to lose weight and keep it off…Stew can do that too.  He has trained athletes in College, Olympians, and Professional Sports (Hockey and Baseball.) Stew Smith is certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). He speaks nationally at fitness conferences that focus on the Tactical Athlete (military, special ops, SWAT, police, fire fighters).

#supportourtroops

The Most Anticipated UFC Matchups of 2017

January 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

The Most Anticipated UFC Matchups of 2017

Unlike boxing and other combat sports, mixed martial arts has a large built-in fan base that will regularly watch most of the big events. The combination of the dedicated fans and the intense training schedule for the fighters often leads to fights getting announced only a few months before they set to take place. There may not be a long list of events scheduled for 2017 at the moment, but there are already a few huge fights planned that every MMA fan must watch. These are the three most anticipated matchups in the first few months of 2017.

Valentina Shevchenko vs Julianna Pena

Valentina Shevchenko and Julianna Pena may not be known by casual MMA fans, but they are two of the most talented female fighters in the world. Shevchenko and Pena are currently ranked as the top two contenders for Amanda Nunes’ UFC Women’s Bantamweight Championship. Julianna Pena has not lost a fight since February 2013, which has helped her shoot up the rankings. Valentina Shevchenko is coming off an impressive victory over Holly Holm in her last fight, and she is also one of the few women that was able to go the distance with Nunes. This should be an extremely exciting fight because both women will be hungry to prove they are one of the best in the world. The winner of the fight will also likely earn a title shot against Nunes very soon. Shevchenko and Pena will face off against each other during the UFC on FOX23 event on January 28th.

Holly Holm vs. Germaine de Randami

While neither Holly Holm or Germaine de Randamie are at the top of their game right now, their upcoming contest has to make the list for its historical significance to the UFC. The winner of their fight at the UFC 208 pay-per-view event on February 11th will be named the first ever UFC Women’s Featherweight Champion. The new weight class should help the careers of both Holm and de Randamie because they were forced to cut a lot of weight during training to fight as a bantamweight. While de Randamie has won three of her first four fights in the UFC, she has yet to beat a top contender. Holly Holm has lost her last two fights, but she has a much more impressive career than her opponent, as she pulled off one of the biggest upsets in UFC history when she defeated Ronda Rousey.

Tyron Woodley vs. Stephen Thompson

Tyron Woodley and Stephen Thompson had one of the best MMA fights of 2016 at UFC 205 in November. The top two welterweights fought to a majority draw, so they will get another chance to decide a winner when they headline the UFC 209 pay-per-view event on March 4th. This may be the most highly anticipated UFC fight of the year because Woodley and Thompson are two of the best pound-for-pound strikers in the world. They did not hold anything back a few months ago, so there is no reason to think they will do anything different in March. They have been overshadowed by bigger names in the past, but Tyron Woodley and Stephen Thompson are going to prove to MMA fans around the world why they should be among the top draws in the UFC right now.

Shaolin vs Terere – Polaris 4 – Free & Full Fight

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

Shaolin vs Terere – Polaris 4 – Free & Full Fight

 

 

Origin Of Slinging And How The Ancient Chamorro People Used It

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Special Forces

Origin Of Slinging And How The Ancient Chamorro People Used It

How to use a sling // fokai // acho atupak

How to use a sling // fokai // acho atupak

The sling was one of the first projectile weapons, creatively developed as early as 10,000 B.C. Slingers played a significant role in the Greek, Persian, Roman, and several Mesopotamian armies, and were also considered to be equal to or more better than archers.

However, it is used more expansively in Europe and the Middle East, the evidence of its use can clearly be found all over the world, with the remarkable exclusion of Australia.

There are various Pacific Island and Mediterranean cultures, which easily maintain solid slinging traditions till today through competitions and historical recreations.

The weapon was cheap and extremely easy to make. Vegetable fibers, plant fibers, animal hide, hair, and several other materials could successfully be used for the pouch and cords.

Unlike a bow, which strictly required specialist experience to produce, a sling could be made by anyone. The sling of the late Paleolithic is generally identical to the modern sling because the design is unique.

The main objective of innovation is the payload of the sling. Rivers stones were popular as their polished, smooth surface caused low air resistance angular rocks, which greatly improved the range and accuracy.

In addition, no matter how selectively these were collected, the shape of natural stones literally varies. This also meant the slinger had to compensate for switching projectile weights, reducing total accuracy. At the same time, Near Eastern armies began providing their slingers with uniform projectiles made from carved stone or baked-clay, at the end of the 7th B.C.

Initially, these were spherical, but by 3000 B.C, biconical projectiles were found to be superior. The last two types would orient point first and shoot in the air like a gun bullet or American football.

The signature weapons of the early Chamorro’s, numerous sizes of sling stones were grinded on both sides and forcefully thrown from a sling with great force in combative times. These stones, also called åcho atupak in the indigenous language of Chamorro, were derived through basalt, limestone, or fire-hardened clay and were hung from slings created from coconut fiber, the latter being far better by way of durability.

Chamorro Slinging

Chamorro Slinging

In historical texts, it is documented that the most successful part of these most oftentimes ovals shaped stones were that ancient Chamorro’s used them with deadly accuracy.

Though commonly related with weaponry of the Latte period, in early colonial history, these stones were used as the arms of resistance to the colonization of Spain, hurled at the harbingers of that particular destruction.

A prized art of warfare, the scope behind the hurling and fashioning of these stones were kept in the men’s domain and were handed over by older males to younger males, usually from father to his son.

The ancient people of Guam used spears and sling stones during war. The sling stones were football like in nature; Chamorro boys are expert throwers because they were trained since when they were very young.

The stones were thrown from a cord sling, the sling stone is fixed in a pocket at the middle of the sling, the stone is shut out by whipping the long cord of the sling.

In the origin of Guam’s sling technology, there are questions that have not been answered satisfactorily. Various archeologists have argued independent development of sling weaponry and possible introduction from the Philippines.

Fortunately, till today in the Philippines or other areas of Southeast Asia, no other technology has been identified. It is much more likely that, conceptually, Melanesia are the introducers of slings and football shaped sling stones.

Bismarck Archipelago would have been the best bet, which are islands located along the northeastern coast of New Guinea, sling stones has been dated to 2000-2300 years ago and 3100 years ago in the Bismarck and Santa Cruz-Reef Island.

R.I.P.PER Guam surfing today mourns the lost of one of its greatest surfing talents ever. BRIAN “The Ripper” Cruz

October 30, 2016 by  
Filed under Special Forces

R.I.P.PER Guam surfing today mourns the lost of one of its greatest surfing talents ever. BRIAN “The Ripper” Cruz

 

 

Small Body BIG Charger.
Can remember Brian having an argument with another Guam bodyborder in the parking lot and he was at tears talking about why he charged so hard and why he put things on the line–because he wanted to represent Guam and so that no outsider would ever come to Guam and show up the locals.. He continued on to vent that what mattered most in his life was his kids.

Burn and Shine, no contesting that the The guy was on Fire

Nobody’s perfect, but his surfing was INSANE. His Love for Guam was real. One of Guams most winning surf competitors at the least.
FLY Ripper. May God be with your soul and your family.
Will miss seeing you in the water. Barrels and Backflips for Life

#guamsurf
#cultivatethespirit
#justaddwater

BIBA MICRONESIA | Ben “Guelu” Rosario of Rota and Selap Tony Piaulig Satwal

October 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Special Forces

BIBA MICRONESIA

Ben “Guelu” Rosario of Rota and Selap Tony Piaulig Satwal.

Guelu has been manifesting and cultivating the Chamorro Culture in the Marianas for decades and is most recent with his leading role in the Linala Cultural Village at Gokna in Guam.

Selap, son of the Great Navigator Mau Piaulig,, (and an affirmed Pwo and accomplished Navigator himself) was brought to Guam by T.A.S.A. Traditions Affirming our Seafaring Ancestry, to revive our lost art of Celestial Navigation as well as to reignite the ways of the Sakman,(traditional Chamorro sailing vessel)— Aspects of Mariana Island history that critically defined us as a people with a massive contribution to Pacific Island trade and exploration.

Together and I dependently water the plants of our history that is largely forgotten by our people giving way to the conveniences of modern technology and westernization

#rooted
#onra
#clothandculture

Next Page »